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Stand down, job keeper and superannuation

Newbie

Views 1236

Replies 5

Hi everyone.

I can see the rule that you can choose whether or not to pay super on additional jobkeeper above the standard wages, but does anyone know if you stand down an employee and pay them jobkeeper if you pay super on the full amount of job keeper or not at all because they've been stood down?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Most helpful response

Former Community Support

Replies 4

Hi @robynrogalski,

 

Thanks for your question.

 

Your employer is required to pay you super on any hours you have worked provided you meet the requirements for super contributions. In short, if your employer pays you over $450 in a calender month they will have to make super contributions on your behalf.

 

In relation to JobKeeper I suggest you refer to the information on our Paying Eligible Employees page as it outlines specific examples where employers are required to pay there employees super.

 

There are three main scenarios I will summaries for you:

1) You work and earn more than the $1500 JobKeeper top up in a fortnight. In this case you employer would need to pay you super on your entire wage.

2) You work and earn for example $600 in a fortnight and then receive the remainder through JobKeeper top up. In this case your employer is required to pay super on the $600 you earned.

3) You are not currently working and receive the full JobKeeper top up. Your employer in this case does not need to make any super contributions on your behalf.

 

So in your case if you are being stood down and are not currently working your employer does not need to make any super contributions for you.

 

I hope this helps clarify your question.

 

JacquelineATO

5 REPLIES 5

Most helpful response

Former Community Support

Replies 4

Hi @robynrogalski,

 

Thanks for your question.

 

Your employer is required to pay you super on any hours you have worked provided you meet the requirements for super contributions. In short, if your employer pays you over $450 in a calender month they will have to make super contributions on your behalf.

 

In relation to JobKeeper I suggest you refer to the information on our Paying Eligible Employees page as it outlines specific examples where employers are required to pay there employees super.

 

There are three main scenarios I will summaries for you:

1) You work and earn more than the $1500 JobKeeper top up in a fortnight. In this case you employer would need to pay you super on your entire wage.

2) You work and earn for example $600 in a fortnight and then receive the remainder through JobKeeper top up. In this case your employer is required to pay super on the $600 you earned.

3) You are not currently working and receive the full JobKeeper top up. Your employer in this case does not need to make any super contributions on your behalf.

 

So in your case if you are being stood down and are not currently working your employer does not need to make any super contributions for you.

 

I hope this helps clarify your question.

 

JacquelineATO

Newbie

Replies 3

can you please provide the link confirming the NO SUPER when on a JK standdown order ? I have searched the ATO site and cannot locate it

Former Community Support

Replies 2

Hi @FSSolutns,

 

I have found some information that may help.

 

View paying your eligible employees on our website for information about superannuation for JobKeeper. There are some examples that may help along with other information for JobKeeper.

 

Hope this helped!

 

 

Newbie

Replies 1

Thanks but that doesn't address the SG confirmation that isn't required for a stood down employee

Former Community Support

Replies 0

Hi @FSSolutns,

 

I may have found what you are looking for, "Employers would not be required to make contributions in relation to additional amounts paid to satisfy the wage condition."

 

The statement was sourced from Superannuation Guarantee with some great examples.

 

David