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DASP Payment enquiry

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Good morning,

 

I have been in Australia since the 6th of June 2016. Until the 5th of June 2017, I was on a 417 WH Visa until I was placed on a subclass A 010 Bridging Visa. I have been on that visa until my permanent residency application was denied on 30th of August. We have withdrawn the application (25th September) and will be departing the country on the 23rd of October 2018.

 

In my 2.5 years in Aus, I have worked in two jobs who've both contributed to my Superfund which now sits at close to 6k.

 

I have begun researching the DASP process and have hit a bit of a roadblock and would really appreciate some assistance.

 

1) Does the 65% taxation rate still apply to Super earned while on a bridging visa?

2) How do I go about submitting an early tax return? 
3) Surely 65% is far too much tax to pay considering I have already been taxed heavily as a foreign resident? I understand it for working holidaymakers who earned a small amount, but I have already paid significant tax and would find it wholly unreasonable to be taxed so highly?

4) On the DASP form, it requires submission of the 1194 form? I submitted a visa withdrawal form numbered 1446.  What is the difference between the two?

 

Any help anyone could provide would be greatly appreciated. I have been let down heavily by the Australian government during my visa application, despite being a hard working and tax paying citizen during my 2.5 years. It would be bitterly disappointing to know despite accumulating my Super through hard work, most of it will be taken away by the Australian government.

 

Kind regards,

Kyle Connolly

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Hi @kcon462,

 

Thanks for getting in touch. We’ve tried to answer your questions in order below:

  • If you’re leaving Australia before 30 June, you may be able to lodge an early tax return if you’re leaving Australia permanently and won’t earn Australian-sourced income (other than interest, dividend and royalty income). You can find step-by-step instructions on how to lodge an early tax return over on our website.
  • Changes to legislation mean that people working in Australia on working holiday maker visas (subclasses 417 and 462) will have a tax rate of 65% applied to departing Australia superannuation payment (DASP) from 1 July 2017. Even though you’ve held a different visa subclass while in Australia, the 65% tax rate will apply if your super balance includes amounts which relate to super contributions you received while on a 417 or 462 visa or an associated bridging visa.

We understand that your situation is different to most others on a WHV; however, our role is to administer the legislation as passed by the Australian Government. If you have feedback on existing legislation, you can choose to write to your local Member of Parliament or contact the Treasury – their details are available at https://australia.gov.au/.

  • When you lodge your application through the DASP online system, we’ll check your immigration and visa status with the Department of Home Affairs. If you lodge through the online system, generally you won't need to complete Form 1194. As Form 1194 relates to your immigration status, you’ll need to check with the Department of Home Affairs as to how it differs from Form 1446.

 

It’s worth keeping in mind that if the value of your super is more than $5,000, your super fund will need certified copies of your identification documents.  We’d encourage you to check in with your super fund to confirm which documents you’ll need to provide to them before you lodge your DASP application.

 

We have a couple of different methods to claim a DASP – an online application tool and a paper form.  We’ve published a detailed knowledge base article on how to claim your DASP here on Community that you might find helpful.

 

Thanks, NicM.

 

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Hi @kcon462,

 

Thanks for getting in touch. We’ve tried to answer your questions in order below:

  • If you’re leaving Australia before 30 June, you may be able to lodge an early tax return if you’re leaving Australia permanently and won’t earn Australian-sourced income (other than interest, dividend and royalty income). You can find step-by-step instructions on how to lodge an early tax return over on our website.
  • Changes to legislation mean that people working in Australia on working holiday maker visas (subclasses 417 and 462) will have a tax rate of 65% applied to departing Australia superannuation payment (DASP) from 1 July 2017. Even though you’ve held a different visa subclass while in Australia, the 65% tax rate will apply if your super balance includes amounts which relate to super contributions you received while on a 417 or 462 visa or an associated bridging visa.

We understand that your situation is different to most others on a WHV; however, our role is to administer the legislation as passed by the Australian Government. If you have feedback on existing legislation, you can choose to write to your local Member of Parliament or contact the Treasury – their details are available at https://australia.gov.au/.

  • When you lodge your application through the DASP online system, we’ll check your immigration and visa status with the Department of Home Affairs. If you lodge through the online system, generally you won't need to complete Form 1194. As Form 1194 relates to your immigration status, you’ll need to check with the Department of Home Affairs as to how it differs from Form 1446.

 

It’s worth keeping in mind that if the value of your super is more than $5,000, your super fund will need certified copies of your identification documents.  We’d encourage you to check in with your super fund to confirm which documents you’ll need to provide to them before you lodge your DASP application.

 

We have a couple of different methods to claim a DASP – an online application tool and a paper form.  We’ve published a detailed knowledge base article on how to claim your DASP here on Community that you might find helpful.

 

Thanks, NicM.